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Old 06-15-2018, 04:21 PM   #1
Lt. JG
 
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Default New owner, Nevada

Hello all,
Just picked up a 1992 1800 SR. Boat is in decent shape for 26 years old. Block is cracked so got a good deal. Time to pull motor and prep for new engine. I may pull the engine from my 1999 Stingray(going thru a major overhaul) just to get it in the water. What are the biggest changes to go from a non-vortec to a vortec motor? Electrical, throttle, fuel? Looks pretty straight forward to me so far.

How do these boat stack up to your standard Bayliner? So far I am impressed with the layout and amenities.

Thanks in advance.
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Old 06-15-2018, 06:18 PM   #2
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Welcome aboard boisebiker!!!!

Brunswick made three boat lines in the same 'class':

Bayliner
Maxum
Searay

Same building materials, techniques, even the same plants in some cases. They all use the Mercruiser engines and drives. they all use the same parts (e.g. Perko cleats and lights, Todd tables and posts, Taylor windshields. Origo stoves).

Bayliner's tend to have more cloth upholstery. Maxum's a mix of cloth and vinyl, Searay's have more vinyl.

They are all equivalent with the exception of consumer perception. Bayliner got a bad name in the runabout market because they were a very attractive entry-level boat that many buyers didn't know how to properly maintain and store.

Any boat left out in the rain for years unprotected is going to start getting spongy, rotted floors. Left long enough that rot creeps into the stringers and transom. An entire brand vilified for the poor behavior of the owners.

You should have a nice boat there. I couldn't' speak to the process of repowering. A lot of mechanics around here should be able to chime in.
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Old 06-15-2018, 07:58 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shrew View Post
Welcome aboard boisebiker!!!!

Brunswick made three boat lines in the same 'class':

Bayliner
Maxum
Searay

Same building materials, techniques, even the same plants in some cases. They all use the Mercruiser engines and drives. they all use the same parts (e.g. Perko cleats and lights, Todd tables and posts, Taylor windshields. Origo stoves).

Bayliner's tend to have more cloth upholstery. Maxum's a mix of cloth and vinyl, Searay's have more vinyl.

They are all equivalent with the exception of consumer perception. Bayliner got a bad name in the runabout market because they were a very attractive entry-level boat that many buyers didn't know how to properly maintain and store.

Any boat left out in the rain for years unprotected is going to start getting spongy, rotted floors. Left long enough that rot creeps into the stringers and transom. An entire brand vilified for the poor behavior of the owners.

You should have a nice boat there. I couldn't' speak to the process of repowering. A lot of mechanics around here should be able to chime in.
I found this information very interesting... Why such a disparity not only perception but in valuations? Sea Ray for size for size (at least locally) is almost always worth as much as a 30% premium over a Bayliner. Seems out of place if indeed they're basically the same boat.

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Welcome aboard by the way, boisebiker!
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Old 06-15-2018, 09:33 PM   #4
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If both engines use the 10 pin round harness connection then just pull engines with everything on them to swap. If both are carborated then Throttle cable should be easy.
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Old 06-18-2018, 01:54 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by CapnCrunch View Post
I found this information very interesting... Why such a disparity not only perception but in valuations? Sea Ray for size for size (at least locally) is almost always worth as much as a 30% premium over a Bayliner. Seems out of place if indeed they're basically the same boat.
Because 'value' is a concept of perception and dictated by the buyer. Because if you ask most people, they will tell you that Bayliners have a bad reputation (from what they've heard), yet will admit they never owned one and probably don't have any real-world experience to back it up. Most people aren't familiar with Maxum because the market share was low. Searay's are everywhere, and their owners love them. Therefore the market bears what people are willing to pay.
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Old 06-18-2018, 07:51 PM   #6
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Thanks for all the replies. I also own a small 1988 Bayliner and I find the fit and finish of the Maxium to be much better and more options from the factory.
I am encouraged about the electrical connector and very hopeful the swap will be uneventful.
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Old 06-19-2018, 05:12 PM   #7
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Will be moving all discussion on motor swap to this thread:
http://www.maxumownersclub.com/forum...html#post53969
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