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Old 05-01-2018, 03:42 AM   #1
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Default Scared to ask....poly glow???

So...after searching around on forums including this one I would like to get some weigh ins on the use of poly glow?

My boat has been somewhat neglected in the polishing and gel coat care department by the previous owner (never waxed or polished but acid washed once each season). He kept it in a slip in freshwater and also didn’t ever use it so I had to work quite hard to clean it. There are some osmosis bubbles on the underside of the hull as well as he liked to beach it so the bottom is quite scratched and there are some chips in it. I have bought a can of clear gel coat to fill the chips and scratches but want to know the best way to “coat” the rest of the boat. It is a bit chalky and I worry about how deep I would have to go into the gel to remove it on an 18 year old boat.

I will try my hand at posting pictures to help with the feedback.

Thanks!!!




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Old 05-01-2018, 11:27 AM   #2
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I believe Roger has used Poly Glow and was happy with the results. I had a sea ray that had a blue gelcoat section that was chalky that I wet sanded with 2000 grit then polished and then waxed which turned out really nice. When sanding go back and forth no circles. 3M makes some good products for cutting through the haze such as Finesse It II.
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Old 05-01-2018, 12:59 PM   #3
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Clear Coat is an autopaint product, not a gelcoat product. You should fill the gouges with a gelcoat repair kit, not a clear coat spray.

How chalky the gelcoat is will dictate how aggressive a cutting agent you start with. If you can firmly rub your hand down the boat and get white residue on your hand, you'll need to start with wet sanding. If it's heavily chalky, but doesn't wipe off, then start with rubbing compound. Then move down the list to each successive lighter.

Technically, if you've done 1 & 2, you can more than likely skip either 3 or 4, depending on results.

1) Wet Sand
2) Rubbing Compound
3) Cutting Agent for heavy oxidation
4) Cutting agent for Medium Oxidation
5) Cutting agent for light oxidation/swirls
6) Wax

You can skip all this and try to go straight to polyglow. Be aware that preparation and application with Polyglow are the key. I've seen improperly prepared boats, where the polyglow peeled like latex paint on varnish. I've seen polyglow improperly applied that looks like someone brushed on polyeurathane.
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Old 05-01-2018, 06:08 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shrew View Post
Clear Coat is an autopaint product, not a gelcoat product. You should fill the gouges with a gelcoat repair kit, not a clear coat spray.

How chalky the gelcoat is will dictate how aggressive a cutting agent you start with. If you can firmly rub your hand down the boat and get white residue on your hand, you'll need to start with wet sanding. If it's heavily chalky, but doesn't wipe off, then start with rubbing compound. Then move down the list to each successive lighter.

Technically, if you've done 1 & 2, you can more than likely skip either 3 or 4, depending on results.

1) Wet Sand
2) Rubbing Compound
3) Cutting Agent for heavy oxidation
4) Cutting agent for Medium Oxidation
5) Cutting agent for light oxidation/swirls
6) Wax

You can skip all this and try to go straight to polyglow. Be aware that preparation and application with Polyglow are the key. I've seen improperly prepared boats, where the polyglow peeled like latex paint on varnish. I've seen polyglow improperly applied that looks like someone brushed on polyeurathane.


Thank you Shrew, I did pick up actual gel coat to fill in the chips and scratches.


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Old 05-02-2018, 01:03 PM   #5
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First I've heard of poli glow was from your post, now I think I will try it. I'm going to test it on a small area and see how it ages. Reviews on the product are excellent.
For your scratch, I recommend following Shrew's steps for blending the repair. Give the gelcoat a slight crown in the scratch when you apply it, and start smoothing the repair when it's about 90% cured. You want the repair gelcoat to be softer than surrounding gelcoat when you blend it in. If you don't already have an electric buffer and wool pad, now is good time to get them.
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Old 05-02-2018, 03:25 PM   #6
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Wet sanding is the ticket.
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Old 05-02-2018, 07:20 PM   #7
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Here's a picture of my previous boat - 1973 Grampian G-26 sailboat - that I owned from 1995 to 2014 when I bought the Maxum.

Every spring prior to launch, she had a Polyglow treatment. The stuff works very well, but you must follow the instructions carefully. Easy to use, extreme UV protection, no fading, colours sparkle.
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File Type: jpg ready for launch-April26-2012 003.jpg (181.3 KB, 16 views)
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Old 05-03-2018, 03:41 AM   #8
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Awesome feedback!!! Thanks guys!!


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Old 05-03-2018, 05:55 PM   #9
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It appears I have a lot to learn about this. Our new to us boat has a couple of quarter to half-dollar size chips along the keel (not to mention peeling what I assume is part of the gel coat above the water line), similar process for these chips?

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Old 05-03-2018, 09:24 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CapnCrunch View Post
It appears I have a lot to learn about this. Our new to us boat has a couple of quarter to half-dollar size chips along the keel (not to mention peeling what I assume is part of the gel coat above the water line), similar process for these chips?

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I would start a new thread as what you described is different from this thread, also include some pictures of the damage areas.
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