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Old 07-06-2010, 03:15 PM   #1
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Default What a difference the right anchor makes!

Replaced my sad, inadequate, ground tackle on Saturday. Gone is the sub par performing, galvanized, no name brand 8# Danforth/fluke style, its attendent 4' of plastic coated 1/4" chain, and only 50' 3/8" 3 strand nylon line.

The shape of the anchor locker on the 2400 SC3 dictates the size of the anchor. Given that, I could not step up to an inexpensive (relatively) 13# galvanized Danforth/fluke as it was both too wide (the stock length) and too long (the shank length) to fit into the locker correctly.

To get one that fits the locker I had to go with a (spendy) Fortress brand FX7, which is a machined aluminum anchor, weighing in at a scant 4 pounds. They claim it replaces a 6 to 9 pound steel anchor and has better holding power. The edges of the flukes are very sharp compared to those of a steel anchor, and the tips of the flukes are more pointed. To help with its light weight I used 8 feet of 3/8" chain (they recommend 3/16" chain) and I attached the mess to 150' of 1/2" 3 strand nylon line.

Used it 3 times this past weekend in shallow water with a sand/mud bottom. It set and held at the first drop each time, whereas the old set up would require 2 or 3 trys to get it to set. I credit the anchor for the most part for the quick set but also know the heavy chain is quite a help.

Having the right stuff sure makes a difference.

Dan
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Old 07-08-2010, 02:14 PM   #2
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Agreed wholeheartedly. We upgraded to a slightly larger Delta a while back, and I doubled the chain length to over 30 feet.

Last weekend we spend the Fourth in a large fairly shallow bay, which has a silty mud bottom, but is covered with 3-4 feet of thick sea grass. I left the GPS on most of the night as the wind came up before fireworks to around 15-25 knots. Our 2400 wanders a fair bit in the wind on the radius, even with 5-8 to 1 scope, but she held tight and I slept like a baby.

When we pulled it up the next day it was necessary to use the engine power to get it out of the mud, and it came up completely packed with sea grass. Fun mess to clean up around the bow pulpit but worth it.

That FX7 is an interesting critter... It looks to stow really nicely plus being light weight. I might have to find a smaller one to use as a stern hook in tighter moorings.
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Old 07-08-2010, 02:54 PM   #3
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hai dan,

can you put a picture of your anchor on this topic, i start anchoring in the netherlands and at the end of the day i'm lying in england. i have two what we call umbrella anchors, but i don't think there the right one four our 2400 sc3

thanks, ed
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Old 07-08-2010, 03:06 PM   #4
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I guess this is a common problem... I currently have a Danforth pivoting steel fluke type. I think it’s about 13lbs and then I have at least 15' of chain. I always give it plenty of line as the books say but I still move a fair bit. This one also doesn’t really fit into the pulpit that well and I always have to go up front and five it a kick to un-jam it. I'm told that this anchor should be fine but it’s not. I wonder if I ought to try another type of anchor? Does anyone know what anchor type maxum originally shipped with?
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Old 07-08-2010, 03:24 PM   #5
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Hi Ed,

I did not take a picture of mine but here is the company's web site. http://www.fortressanchors.com/
I also included a link to another web site that has a couple of reviews of the FX-7. http://www.boatersworld.com/product/MP63490664.htm

If you are considering one of these I've seen them on other web sites for less than $100.00 USD. Keep in mind though, and as Jim alluded to, you have to have the right type of anchor to match the conditions you are anchoring in. The Danforth/fluke style (most common and is what the Fortress FX-7 is) works in sand/mud bottoms the best. If you are anchoring on a rocky bottom, or grass, you need a different anchor type. The FX-7 model is their smallest and is the only one that will fit in the 2400 SC3's anchor locker - and just barely at that.

Agreed Jim, it is an interesting critter, and it can be disassembled for storage. I'm pretty impressed with it so far.

Dan
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Old 07-12-2010, 01:42 PM   #6
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I think the type of bottom you're anchoring in will dicate the type of anchor you use. There are pro's and con's to all of them. First off, chain is important no matter what you're using for an anchor. The more chain and the heavier the better. It holds the angle of force on the anchor down low and improves holding. I find that mushroom anchors (umbrella) are great for extremely large moorings and small utility boats, but not great as standard ground tackle for anything else. Danforth's are fantastic for clay, thick mud and sand. I use a danforth, but unless it's set very well and the bottom has good holding, then if you swing on tides or current they don't always reset as well as a Bruce (claw style anchor) or a plow/CQR (CQR is really just an articulated plow with a hing. Bruce, plow and CQR's are great for resetting. Plows and CQR's are much better suited in grass or weeds than any of the other's as well. Bruce anchor's reset the best of all of them. Danforth's don't set well in grass and weed's.

I anchor mostly in sand and clay, but have several areas with grass and weeds. My next anchor will most likelly be either a plow or CQR which best fits the areas that I anchor in.
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Old 07-12-2010, 02:04 PM   #7
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Exactly - different bottoms call for different anchors. We're lucky I suppose, only thing we have to anchor in is sand and/or mud.

I continue to be impressed by this little 4 pound Fortress anchor. Dropped it in again yesterday and it again set the first time. Waters were just a little choppy and there were lots of boats coming in to anchor - creating small, but frequent, wakes. Water was shallow - about 3 feet, and I had very little scope out, maybe 15 feet total, due to the tight quarters. During the approximate 2.5 to 3 hours we were on the hook the boat had swung about 100 degrees from where it started but never dragged.

Dan
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