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Old 01-16-2011, 08:33 PM   #1
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Default Sea worthiness of the 1700XR

There are a lot over here in the UK that say the bow riders are useless in the slightest rough sea. I have one of these boats and am still yet to fully test its capability, what i do know is that some of the lakes in the USA are bigger than our seas

I have a bow cover that laps over the bottom of the windscreen (wind shield to you) not sure if that would help a huge deal. Have any of you any experience in a rough lake or sea or even got any video of bow riders at work
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Old 01-16-2011, 09:57 PM   #2
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It is what it is. An openbow boat.........no cover.

Other than learning to ride the waves in heavy seas, I would NOT risk life nor limb in a 17 foot boat out in rough seas period! I don't know how much boating experience you have and I don't mean anything personal here please but that boat is not meant to be out in rough seas. I don't think you want to risk your life to prove a point. I had a 1988 2150 Bayliner and it wasn't so much the length but the freeboard of the boat that made this openbow boat a capable boat in rough waters. Again you don't have that either.

In summary your boat could get you back home if a storm or nasty weather pops up but to think you are in a boat that is designed for rough seas is a mistake. Hunt for flat calm water.......IMHO

No boating in the North Sea Please :-)

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Old 01-16-2011, 10:10 PM   #3
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I wont ever be in the north sea, maybe from southampton to the isle of wight which it is more than capable. It pees me off that people say these boats are useless except on flat water. Obviously a storm 8 and i wont go out, but i wouldnt go out in any boat in that wind! Its like you say, i see the waves, watch the tide and throttle on and off as i need to and ride with the waves instead of trying to go through them.
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Old 01-16-2011, 10:23 PM   #4
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Just good common sense is all you need................or move up to a bigger boat..........

Good Luck

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Old 01-16-2011, 10:56 PM   #5
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about the first.....right bigger....about the second.....we don't know what's in warpa's purse.......but warpa remember 1 thing even if the water is flat as a coin.......within 10 minutes it can chance.....and if you are on a big and wide water/sea...well phone rescue 911 to pick you up.... because with a 17 ft open bow you wont make it at home.....i have learnt always to look behind me to the sky....( and yes it has saved me this year from problems during my holiday...so that i was in time at a harbour.) i was going to the north...the wind was coming from that direction.....but high up in the sky the wind was from the south....the sky up high was black and it brought us storm and heavy rainfall....glad we where in the harbour,... because in an area of 3 miles at the open water 15 ships sunk to the bottom (people were saved by rescue teams) and it was only local bad weather......above 5/6 stop boating with your bowrider (i have had an 19 ft open bow.... and once i was in a storm at the biggest lake in the netherlands, called "ijsselmeer" ........once but never again........

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Old 01-17-2011, 12:59 AM   #6
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i see a few at swansea.and seem to do ok.
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Old 01-18-2011, 03:09 PM   #7
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I think it's helpful to look at a few key factors:

1) What are the conditions typically like in the area you boat?

2) What will the boat be used for?

3) Who/How many people?


We'd really need to know more to provide an accurate assessment.
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Old 01-18-2011, 11:06 PM   #8
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I've been staying out of this debate only cuz I am not familiar with your waters...however....after experiencing some crazy water with 10-14ft waves last spring in our 35 ftr...and watching our friends in a 24 ftr in the same waters next too us....I can only imagine what it would be like in 4-6 ft waves in a bow rider...
with that said....you wouldn't get me out there in that kind of water in a bow rider....now..I'm not normally chicken to be in big water...having been 2k ft under it..it doesn't really bother me....but watching the look of my wife's face in that water is something I don't want to experience again....

so...if it's only you in big water...knock yourself out...but have a working VHF radio handy that is connected to gps so the coast guard can pluck your butt out of the water and not endanger someone else....

just my 2 cents worth......I feel taking a small boat out in any kind of big water is very irresponsible and borders on the line of crazy....


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Old 01-24-2011, 08:48 AM   #9
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Ha ha Sea Puppy! You reminded me of what the boat salesman said to me off to the side. "If you want to get another boat, keep the wife happy and never put her in a position where she is scared, if the weather sucks hold off for a better day!"
Dave
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Old 01-24-2011, 02:05 PM   #10
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yep...if the admiral ain't happy...tain't nobody going to be happy!!!


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Old 01-26-2011, 10:27 PM   #11
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The sea is no further than a mile or two from any coast, its the Isle of Wight of the south coast of England, only problem the can be winds and currents from the English channel. This is a video of someone in the area but have not quite cleared into the open water, once in the open it gets choppy but is only a mile to the island.

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Old 01-27-2011, 04:49 PM   #12
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Well that video is of a bow rider, and it looks like it's doing fine. Though it also looks like pretty benign conditions. Obviously the weather and tides (particularly when combined) impact seastate. Sure the weather can change quickly, but I've found the less you pay attention the faster weather turns. I think as long as you carefully pick your days, you'll have fun. You'll be limited in how far from safe harbor you can roam. The smaller the boat the fewer comfortable boating days and the less tolerant they are of getting caught in bad weather. Open boats even more so. (Though I wouldn't categorize a bow rider and a center console in the same generic category of 'open boat', since they are design to self bail much better).

So can you boat? More than likely. Can you boat frequently, or as much as you'd like? Probably not.

Pick your days, keep a weather eye on the horizon, err on the side of caution.
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