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Old 06-30-2011, 03:13 AM   #1
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Hey everyone,

New here...obviously based on my question. I have owned boats before but much much more ghetto boats. There are a few switches and sounds I'm not used to that I hoped you all could clear up. First I have a 1999 1900 SR, with a 5.0 V8.

When I turn the key I get a solid beep that lasts over a minute. I have read that this is checking oil pressure and temperatures? Is it normal for this to stay on that long? I assume I should not try to start the engine until it subsides?

There is a switch under the throttle that says run and off. None of my older boats had this, what does that control?

There are a large amount of warnings to use the blower. I have never had any issues, how strict are all of you about using the blower for 4 minutes prior to starting the engine?

Any other tips?

Thanks guys!
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Old 06-30-2011, 04:02 AM   #2
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welcome to the zoo.....hope you have lotsa fun with the new toy....however drivin a non-ghetto boat is a bit different than a ghetto boat....you need to start drinkin bottled water insteada that moonshine stuff.....you need to start holding your pinky out when you have a coffee cup....then ya gotta learn not to crash into the dock like ya did with them aluminum boats......hahaha..ok..just kidding....

first off....the solid beep is telling you that the sensors on the engine for oil pressure...drive lube oil level...and water temp is working....so...once you hear the tone or what I concider it...screaming demon....turn the key and start the engine....the tone or beep should go right out....

2nd...the switch under the throttle is an emergency cut off switch for the engine...the purpose is if your in rough water...there should be a lanyard attached too it by sticking a ring or clip on top and flip the switch up to hold it in place..then clip the other end to your belt or loop...if you get tossed overboard...the lanyard should pull out and flip the switch to the off position..thus shutting the engine down so it doesn't leave you in the water with no way home......

and finally...the blower....ok...this is an enclosed engine in a plastic case...so...since it's gas..fumes have a tendancy in an eclosed space to go "BOOOOM"...
so...be safe...do the sniff test and open the engine cover and smell for gas....then start the blower and run it for the required 4 min....wouldn't want you to be a statistic by blowing yourself and the boat up.......we read about it all the time...people refueling the boat...didn't run the blowers...started the engine and BOOM!!!....didn't run the blower and didn't do a sniff test.......every yr it's the same thing.....

and also....if your really really new to the cruisers or speed boats..take a boat safety course.....


SP
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Old 06-30-2011, 04:02 AM   #3
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rjenkins, welcome to the zoo as SeaPuppy says... I believe the long beep means you're low on outdrive lubricant. There should be a small (pint-size) plastic container/resevoir with a black, screw-top cap that has clear markings on it as to where the fluid-level should be. I'd check that thing first, as the long beep is warning you you're out of outdrive oil.

And the switch under the throttle probably (at one time) had a safety lanyard attached to it. The idea behind it is you attach the lanyard to your person/the driver and if they hurl themselves out of the boat by doing a sharp turn or other rowdy manuver, it cuts the engine off (similar to the lanyard on a JetSki) so the boat doesn't run over the person in the water and chop them up and also keeps the potential passengers safe.

In addition to running the blower (I usually run it two minutes), I first do a sniff-check in the engine compartment to check for fumes. The idea being I don't want the blower to blow out "evidence" of a gas fume leak... so I take a big whiff of the engine compartment and THEN run the blower for a couple minutes. Unfortunately you don't get a second chance when there's a kaboom, so yes... this is VERY important!

Shrew/SeaPuppy? How'd I do?!!!
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Old 06-30-2011, 04:04 AM   #4
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not bad concidering you were after me!!

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Old 06-30-2011, 04:19 AM   #5
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Yeah, we both replied @ 9:02PM... I guess a Super Moderator trumps a Lt. Commander!
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Old 06-30-2011, 12:32 PM   #6
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Ditto to all of the above. (Nice work jeffmeans). Rjenkins, welcome aboard. I suspect the other boats you've owned may have been outboards. Safety employs a model I like to think of as "Tombstone Technology". In other words, someone (more than likely many folks) had to die before someone realized there was a problem that needed solving. Such as a blower in the compartment of a closed inbouard engine. A safety lanyard in case the operator falls out of the boat while underway, etc. Stop and ask yourself three questions:

1) Can it happen?
A: IF there is a placard or safety equipment in place it has happened so someone in the past
2) Will it happen?
A: Maybe, maybe not. However, IF there is a placard or safety equipment in place it has happened so someone in the past
3) Do I want it to happen to me?
A: Probably not


Another way of looking at it.....'Nobody cares that they saved themselves 4 minutes while they're standing dockside wathcing their boat burn'. I'm not sure if you have or not, but taking a safe boating course is always a great idea as well. If you have great, keep thinking about it and asking questions.
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Old 06-30-2011, 12:56 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffmeans View Post
Yeah, we both replied @ 9:02PM... I guess a Super Moderator trumps a Lt. Commander!



RHIP!!!!!

(rank has it's priviliges)
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Old 06-30-2011, 01:03 PM   #8
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Well I guess I'll add my 2 cents here, first welcome and second of all......all these suggestions and ideas of safety are good ones to live by. If you have not .............please take a safe boating course...go to www.usps.org and your find one in your area.

Also get your boat inspected by a Vessel Safety Check inspector to make sure you have the required USGC reqirements. Its free and you will get a sticker. Your state that you live in might have some requirements also. Find a boating buddy that you can sponge off for infor. Like this place........we enjoy helping fellow boaters!

So have fun with that new boat and have a great summer!

Roger
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Old 06-30-2011, 01:13 PM   #9
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Thanks for the replies everyone! Dont worry I plan on drinking only bottled water and beer now, with my pinky out of course. HA!

It sounds like there is some discrepency about what the rather annoying alarm means. I check the reservoir. I guess my only follow up questions would be...how do you run just the radio when that thing is going!?

All good points about the blower. My last boat was modified inboard outboard. So while it wasnt outboard, it also was a large oversized engine compartment with storage, that was far from air tight. I'll follow the warnings . I did take a boating safety course, I just wanted to get a pulse of how much was over-zealous warnings and how much was legit. Thanks again!
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Old 06-30-2011, 02:11 PM   #10
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Welcome aboard Mr. Jenkins.

Regarding the beep (alarm): When you turn the key to the "Run" (aka On) position you should hear the alarm, every time. The system is simply verifying that the alarm is working. However, judging from my boat, the beep should only last 5, maybe 10 seconds. If yours is lasting for over a minute there is likely a problem. As SP mentioned 3 things will trigger the alarm; Engine temp too high, a loss of oil pressure, and low outdrive oil. Of course, before you start the engine there isn't any oil pressure, nor is it likely the engine is too hot, so that pretty leaves the outdrive oil level as Jeff mentioned above. Keep in mind that you need to use an oil specifically designed for your out drive so don't dump just anything in there.

As for the potential of having the sun glasses blown of your head, or launching your significant other's chihuahua from the A dock to the D dock, it is real. As Shrew said those blowers and warning stickers are there for a reason so heed or bleed. Since this boat is new to you I'd suggest:
1) You first check every hose clamp that has anything to do with fuel delivery to the engine, from the filler neck on the side of the boat right up to the fuel pump and carb. Make sure they are tight, but don't over tighten. Inspect the rubber lines (afterall, the boat is 12 years old).
2) Get into the habit of opening the engine cover each time you put gas into the tank. Doing so will help ensure you catch any leaks should they occure. take a good whiff after fueling.
3) At the start of your day on the water get into the habit of opening the engine cover before you start the engine for the first time. Do a quick visual inspection and stick your head in there to sniff around. Start the engine with the cover open so you can see if anything is squirting out from anywhere.
4) Gasoline fumes are heavier than air so they will settle in the bottom of the bilge below the engine. If you look at the hoses from the blower one of them goes down there. The blower is supposed to evacuate those fumes - so, run the blower. for at least 2 minutes, 4 is better. Again, since the boat is new to you make sure the blower hoses are even attached.

Good luck...

Dan
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Old 06-30-2011, 04:01 PM   #11
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Where are the pics of your new boat? We love to ogle other people's toys. My one tip is to ensure the outdrive is UP before pulling the boat out of the water. If the trim gage isn't working always do a double check, the 1900s sit low enough on the trailer it is bad news if you drive off with the drive down.

-JP
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Old 06-30-2011, 05:30 PM   #12
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Hey thanks again for the replies. Here is the only picture I have...while at work:

http://www.maxumownersclub.com/forum...hp?albumid=128

One last dumb question. I cant get the damn swim ladder down. I can pull the guides out about 2 inches but then they are desinged to stop. The ladder then only goes as far out as those guides allow. It seems like it should flip down from that point, and there is a rectangle in the swim step that is cut out from the rest of the plastic. But when I pull it doesnt swing up allowing for access to the ladder. I dont want to pull so hard I break it if I am just doing it completely wrong. How do I get this damn thing out?

Thanks!
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Old 06-30-2011, 08:42 PM   #13
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The fiberglass square doesn't move. To get the swim ladder down, slide both guides as far out as the will go, then slide one of the guides back in. This will allow the ladder pins to clear and you can get the pins on the bottom of the ladder to come out of the guides one at a time. I'll see if I can make a quick video when I get home. Also, if your ladder is in poor shape, windline has a lifetime warranty on their ladders. Mine had corroded on the bottom, I snet it to them and got a brand new one for free (http://www.maxumownersclub.com/forum...indline-Ladder).
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Old 06-30-2011, 09:42 PM   #14
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Awesome thanks CountryME. I was messing around with that but it didnt seem right. I know exactly what you mean though, so dont worry about making a video.

You guys rock! Heading to Glendo in a couple hours with all of my questions answered. Thanks again!
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Old 07-05-2011, 06:25 PM   #15
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All good points. When it comes to the blower I use the same rule with my big boat as I did with all the little ones. First thing I ever do is turn on the blower. Before getting it ready on the trailer turn on the blower. My boats are in slips so before I go about untying, getting lines ready, taking covers all the way off I turn on the blower. When I've spent the day in the cove before I go to pull anchor or untie I turn on the blower. You can easily have to problem 299 times in a row........that 300th time though might ruin your day.

Oh and the warning buzzer shouldn't go off more than 5-10 seconds. If the engines are not running it's not an alarm so you might now have an engine problem but you do have a buzzer problem.
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