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Old 06-20-2018, 02:26 AM   #31
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Your boat, your money. Best of luck.
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Old 06-20-2018, 03:42 AM   #32
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I'll wind up doing a whole ROI study before I'm able to decide, because engineer.

All the rest of the maintenance went fine. Replaced bellows, painted and did all the fluids. No surprises, which was nice.

Determined that the water leak is rainwater through the hull seam, so that's my project before winter.
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Old 06-20-2018, 12:23 PM   #33
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Understand the ROI however there is always the wildcard of emotion where you fall in love with another boat so the planned duration for the ROI goes out the window.
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Old 06-20-2018, 12:39 PM   #34
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Why don't you put in the manifolds and risers yourself? There's 8 bolts and 3 hose clamps. You get a look at the system to determine condition. Spark plugs are right there too. Cost of parts is $1500. No better time than present to dive in.
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Old 06-20-2018, 05:37 PM   #35
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Excellent points fellows. Thanks.

I'm pretty enamoured with this boat right now, but it's true that could change. It's my first boat, so I guess that's part of the reason I'm hoping to make it through the season without having to make the decision. I really don't know what to expect from anything.

I had it out on the weekend with four adults and two kids and discovered that I had to send my dad into the cabin in order to get enough weight forward to get up on plane. That made a more powerful engine quite appealing at the time.

As for doing the work myself, I really should. I've replaced several car engines and done just about everything else wrt rebuilding a car. The boat scares me a little more for some reason. Also and annoyingly, the serial number for the engine wore away over the years, so I'm worried about buying the wrong parts. I think I've deduced what it is, but I can't be sure. I guess I should just ask if I can exchange them if I get it wrong the first time...
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Old 06-20-2018, 06:00 PM   #36
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Your title should have the engine serial number. If not, a 2004 5.7 mercruiser is enough info to get you the right parts. I see manifolds and risers on craigslist every week.
Regarding getting up on plane, since your WOT is 4000, you are over-propped. What size props do you have? You could go down 2 or 3 pitch and get better hole shot and on plane quicker. Smart tabs help with this also.
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Old 06-20-2018, 06:21 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrsick View Post
Your title should have the engine serial number. If not, a 2004 5.7 mercruiser is enough info to get you the right parts. I see manifolds and risers on craigslist every week.
Regarding getting up on plane, since your WOT is 4000, you are over-propped. What size props do you have? You could go down 2 or 3 pitch and get better hole shot and on plane quicker. Smart tabs help with this also.
Unfortunately, it's not in the title, but here's hoping you are right that they are fairly standard by year.

I didn't mention, but after the boat was maintained, she makes 4300 RPM. At first, I thought my mechanic must be some sort of wizard because I couldn't figure out what he did that would make such a big difference. Then I noticed that the drive trim was a little up. I pushed it all the way down (because for some reason I thought that's where it should be) and the boat dropped back to 4000 RPM max again. I think that issue can be chalked up to operator error.

It occurred to me yesterday that if prop angle made that big a difference, maybe dynamically adjusting trim while getting up on plane would make it easier? I also have to figure the trim tabs. I just sort of randomly poke them at intervals.
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Old 06-20-2018, 10:53 PM   #38
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Tuck the drive all the way down to get on plane then trim out for best speed. Same with trim tabs but you can also use them to balance side to side depending on where weight is distributed.
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Old 06-21-2018, 12:12 AM   #39
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yep, what he said ^
You want the front of your hull to be out of the water and above the bow wave when on plane. By trimming the drive all the way down you force the bow to stay in contact with the water surface. This increases drag and reduces efficiency.
When trimming out, make an input then ride it for a minute to see the effect. I know boaters that like their drives trimmed just short of cavitation.
Practice this weekend and you can let your dad be part of the family and put his days as boat ballast behind.
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Old 06-21-2018, 01:38 AM   #40
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Thanks guys. I will give that a shot.

I think the prop was cavitating quite a lot when up on plane, trimmed down fully and at WOT. I expect that was the main source of the difference, pushing against that extra bit of resistance. The sound from the prop was remarkably different with a few degrees change in trim. Went from an angry growl to a happy whir.

I design ships for a living, but have somehow managed to avoid learning anything at all about planing craft, so your advice is much appreciated.
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